Microsoft ISV Architect Evangelist?

Microsoft ISV Architect Evangelist?

So my soon to be title will be “Microsoft ISV Architect Evangelist”…. Yeah, wasn’t sure exactly what that meant either. And honestly, I’m not sure I’ll really know until I’m in it. But I found a great description on JasonDe Lorme’s LinkedIn page that it sums up:

ISV Architect Evangelists (aka “ISV AEs”) provide architectural guidance and insight into Microsoft product roadmaps to Microsoft’s most important ISVs (Independant Software Vendors) in order to accelerate their adoption of emerging Microsoft technologies. ISV AEs act as a trusted technical advisor, working to find the best overall solutions. ISV AEs can act as a resource broker to assist with locating the correct resources within Microsoft to meet ISVs needs.

Blue Badge

Blue Badge

I’ve been very lucky in my career so far. I’ve had the pleasure of working on some amazing software with many brilliant people over the years. And starting in two weeks, I’ll be continuing that trend.

Starting at the end of the month, I’ll be joining Microsoft. The official title is “Senior ISV Architect Evangelist” but, as with most titles, it doesn’t really tell you much. Basically I’ll be helping ISVs leverage the Microsoft stack. I’m excited because it means I’ll be knee-deep in the latest and greatest bits. And given the number of cool toys coming to the developer’s toy box, there will be plenty to wade through.

Back in the early 90’s I read Guy Kawasaki’s “Selling the Dream” and thought this sounded like a dream job. And beginning next month, I get to start doing it.

2010 MVP Award

Today I received word that I had been awarded an MVP for Microsoft Communications Server again. I’m very excited about Unified Communications and the upcoming  Microsoft Communications Server “14”. I’ll be doing a lot of work and posting regarding UCMA 3.0 over the next few months. If you’re thinking about UC development its time to start boning up on UCMA, it is where all the Microsoft UC goodness is heading.

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2009 MVP Award

Yesterday I received an email announcing that I had been made an MVP for my work in the Microsoft Communications Server community. This is my first MVP award. I’m very excited to be a part of the MVP program and to be a resources to others in the community. I expect Unified Communications (and OCS along with it) to experience substantial growth over the next 5 years and I’m thrilled to be a part of it.

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I Snapped My Chrome!

I Snapped My Chrome!

One of the more interesting features in Google’s new Chrome browser is “Application Shortcuts”. These are web site links that Chrome places on your Start menu, Desktop and/or Quick Launch bar. When launched they open with a trimmed down UI, giving the web application a decidedly “desktop” feel. I’ve created shortcuts for a number of applications, including my GMail account.

Today, while responding to an email, I got what is best described as a “black screen of death”. Chrome informed me that “Ah, Snap! Something went wrong while displaying this webpage. To continue, press Reload or go to another page”.

Aside from being a rather silly error message, it tells me nothing of value. I don’t know what went wrong. It doesn’t help me diagnose if it was Chrome that failed or the site it was viewing. And the methods suggested for resolving this error are not valid in “shortcut mode” as there are no toolbar items to press or URL boxes to navigate with.

One aspect of this message that I like is that it assumes the user isn’t an expert. It doesn’t shove a bunch of technical information at the poor user who cannot do anything with it anyway. Why needlessly make things confusing?

The problem is that they didn’t give any obvious way to get at the technical information for those who can make use of it. And if you’re going to go with the simplicity route then you need to make sure your error message gives a working resolution to the user. That novice user isn’t going to make the same assumption that I did and press F5 to reload the page.